2/19/2016

U.S. Demand for Diesel Cars Collapses

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Sales of diesel-powered passenger cars have nearly vanished in the wake of Volkswagen AG's admission five months ago that it doctored 580,000 of its diesels to cheat U.S. emission standards, The Wall Street Journal reports.

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Sales of diesel-powered passenger cars have nearly vanished in the wake of Volkswagen AG's admission five months ago that it doctored 580,000 of its diesels to cheat U.S. emission standards, The Wall Street Journal reports.

The Journal cites statistics from WardsAuto.com that show overall sales of diesel cars in the U.S. averaged at least 4,800 units per month last year before the VW diesel scandal erupted in September.

But monthly demand plummeted below 800 units in the final quarter of 2015 and sagged to only 225 units in January, according to WardsAuto. Low gasoline prices contributed. But the online news and data service points out that sales of diesel-powered work trucks, such as heavy-duty pickups and vans, have remained strong.

VW has been the largest supplier of diesel cars in America for many years. But it has been forced to suspend sales in September, pending agreement with the Environmental Protection Agency about how to fix already-sold diesels and prove its new models truly meet pollution limits.