9/17/2014 | 1 MINUTE READ

TRW Unveils New Family of Vision, Radar Sensors

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TRW Automotive Holdings Corp. is launching a series of advanced vision and radar sensors for a new generation of automated braking systems demanded by upcoming European standards for pedestrian and other obstacle detection systems.

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TRW Automotive Holdings Corp. is launching a series of advanced vision and radar sensors for a new generation of automated braking systems demanded by upcoming European standards for pedestrian and other obstacle detection systems.

The company expects similar rules in the U.S. will drive adoption of the technologies in the America market.

The new S-Cam4 camera family includes an array of high-resolution scalable cameras with an exceptionally wide field of vision and the ability to detect objects crossing the path of the vehicle at various speeds. Coupled with short-range radar, the imagers can be used with automatic braking systems to avoid collisions with pedestrians. TRW predicts the first commercial applications will appear by 2018.

The new cameras will be paired with Mobileye NV's Eye Q4 image processor and object recognition algorithms and TRW's longitudinal/lateral control algorithms for advanced driver-assist systems. The units combine an integrated processor and imager in a module about the size of a deck of playing cards.

The company also has introduced an advanced camera system that combines telephoto, normal and extreme wide-angle lenses. The so-called TriCam4 version enables lane-keeping capability for semi-automated driving systems.

TRW notes that the triple-lens camera can be combined with long-range radar to give a self-driving car the ability to safely follow vehicles ahead. Portions of the system are being used in Europe now in the Lancia Delta small luxury car. That application uses active steering and haptic warnings for the driver to automatically steer the car for short distances.

Similarly, combining camera and short-range radar sensors results in traffic jam-assisted driving, in which a vehicle equipped with adaptive cruise control can come to an automatic full stop, then resume.

A variation of the vision systems combines a camera and radar to provide the ability of a car to automatically steer away from an obstacle.