10/31/2016 | 1 MINUTE READ

The Internet of Moving Things

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

In the spirit of thinking big, Veniam Works has a whopper of an idea: turn every vehicle and other moving object in the world into a series of mobile hotspots that connect to each other via “mesh networks.” 

Share

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

In the spirit of thinking big, Veniam Works has a whopper of an idea: turn every vehicle and other moving object in the world into a series of mobile hotspots that connect to each other via “mesh networks.” 

The four-year-old Silicon Valley startup company kicked off the ambitious effort a few years ago with several hundred nodes in Porto, Portugal. The connected fleet ranges from taxis and public buses to garbage trucks, ships and cranes.

The technology virtually eliminates dead zones and can provide free Internet access to hundreds of thousands of people in or near connected vehicles, according to Veniam. The system also allows data to be shared between the various nodes to improve productivity and efficiency. Porto’s garbage trucks, for example, minimizes travel time and costs by using information from trash can sensors to set daily collection routes. In turn, the connected trucks and other vehicles improve traffic flow by providing real-time location, speed and acceleration information to each other and the infrastructure.  

Fleets and other businesses also can use real-time data to track their assets, identify potential bottlenecks and improve overall logistics management. Future applications could include mobile payment transactions and targeted security cameras.   

Veniam is launching additional pilot programs in Barcelona, New York City and Singapore. “The potential benefits are enormous,” says co-founder Robin Chase, who previously founded Zipcar, Buzzcar and other new mobility services. “Mesh networks take advantage of excess wireless capacity and leverage existing assets to provide greater connectivity and multipurpose functions.”