7/29/2014

Poll: Most Americans Would Consider Self-Driving Cars

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Nearly 25% of U.S. drivers would buy a car today that could drive itself and another 50% would at least consider doing so, according to a new survey by Web site Insurance.com.

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Nearly 25% of U.S. drivers would buy a car today that could drive itself and another 50% would at least consider doing so, according to a new survey by Web site Insurance.com.

Almost one-third of 2,000 licensed drivers polled say they would stop driving entirely if their vehicles could assume that task.

The survey finds American motorists intrigued but also skeptical about the capabilities of autonomous vehicles. Three in five respondents believe they can make better decisions behind the wheel than a computer can. And 25% declare they will never buy a self-driving vehicle.

But Insurance.com notes that safety considerations are the biggest attraction for self-driving technology. Researchers blame human error for 95% of vehicle crashes in the U.S.

An analysis by the 93-year-old Eno Center for Transportation in Washington, D.C., estimates that equipping 10% of cars on U.S. roads with self-driving ability would eliminate 211,000 crashes, avoid 1,100 fatalities and save nearly $23 billion annually.

If 90% of cars were autonomous, in the U.S. crashes would plunge by 4.2 million, sparing 21,700 lives and saving $450 billion per year, according to the Eno Center.