12/2/2013

GM’s Self-Drive System On Track for 2020 Debut

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General Motors Co. says its Super Cruise system, which promises nearly autonomous driving, should be ready for production by the end of the decade.

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General Motors Co. says its Super Cruise system, which promises nearly autonomous driving, should be ready for production by the end of the decade. The company forecasts a price close to the $3,000 customers currently pay for the less powerful driver assist features available in a 2014 Cadillac.

GM is testing Cadillac SRX prototypes that feature the company's latest combination of radar, ultrasonic sensors, cameras and GPS map data to enable a vehicle to automatically control its speed, braking and in-lane steering.

Super Cruise, which is similar to active cruise controls already offered by some luxury carmakers, is designed to work in bumper-to-bumper traffic and on freeways. GM's version may permit hands-free driving at low speed but will require the driver to hold the wheel at higher speeds.

BMW and Daimler's Mercedes-Benz division already offer low-speed systems for the 2014 model year that actively turn the steering wheel and operate pedals in traffic jams. Both expect to have hands-free, feet-free software that can handle highway driving within a few years.

Nissan Motor Co. Ltd. also is planning to deliver fully self-driving cars using technology called Autonomous Drive by the end of the decade.