8/14/2015

Forecast: Wireless Battery Chargers to Bow in 2017

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The first wireless charging systems for plug-in hybrid and all-electric vehicles will be commercially available by 2017, according to a new report from Strategy Analytics Inc.

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The first wireless charging systems for plug-in hybrid and all-electric vehicles will be commercially available by 2017, according to a new report from Strategy Analytics Inc. Such systems will make it easier to recharge batteries and accelerate consumer acceptance of electrified vehicles.

But the Boston-based research firm says wireless technology won't surpass current conductive chargers, which are plugged directly into charging ports on a vehicle, until at least 2028. Cost is the primary barrier for inductive systems, which can replenish a battery pack when a vehicle is parked near a wireless charging pad.

Industry regulations and standardization also are needed to ensure wireless chargers will work with different brands of EVs. SAE International is expected to issue recommendations for standards covering wireless chargers within the next one to two years.

Strategy Analytics notes that several carmakers and suppliers are developing and testing wireless inductive chargers. Last year, BMW and Daimler formed a partnership to co-develop the technology. Hyundai, Renault and Toyota also have announced their own individual development plans. Qualcomm Inc., which has been promoting its Halo wireless charger for three years, is working with Daimler and the FIA's Formula E racing series.