10/2/2015

Driver-Assist Features Could Avert 28% of Crashes

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If advanced driver-assistance systems were widely adopted in the U.S., they could reduce crashes 28% and save about 9,900 lives per year, according to The Boston Consulting Group.

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If advanced driver-assistance systems were widely adopted in the U.S., they could reduce crashes 28% and save about 9,900 lives per year, according to The Boston Consulting Group.

BCG's analysis estimates the savings to society at $251 billion per year. But the study notes that growth in demand for so-called ADAS technologies has been only 2%-5%. It blames slow acceptance on the cost of such systems and a lack of consumer awareness about their benefits.

ADAS include such technologies as adaptive cruise control, automatic emergency braking, blind-spot warning, night vision, surround view, park assist and lane-keeping systems.

BCG predicts the penetration rate for ADAS features will reach only 3% by 2020. It estimates the average cost of such systems will drop about 25% to $660 by then, compared with an average current consumer willingness to pay of $390. The report figures the cumulative "safety contribution" of ADAS comes to $16,300 over a vehicle's 20-year lifespan.

The report, which was commissioned by the Motor & Equipment Manufacturers Assn., urges carmakers to educate consumers about the benefits of ADAS technologies. It also calls for the presence of such features to be included in government safety ratings.