3/17/2014 | 1 MINUTE READ

Denso to Begin Novel Wireless Charger Test

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Denso Corp. has begun a 10-month test of an inductive charging system designed to operate a truck's refrigeration unit when the vehicle's engine is switched off.

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Denso Corp. has begun a 10-month test of an inductive charging system designed to operate a truck's refrigeration unit when the vehicle's engine is switched off.

Denso's prototype inductive charger

Denso has installed a prototype system with an inductor plate on the pavement of a 7-Eleven convenience store in Toyota City, Japan. It also has equipped a Yamato Transport medium-duty delivery truck with a receiving plate mounted under the vehicle ahead of the rear axle.

When the truck is in position, the two plates are about 12 inches apart. Electricity flowing through the pavement plate induces current in the truck-mounted plate with no special action required by the truck driver.

Most inductive chargers, such as Qualcomm Inc.'s Halo system, are intended to replenish an electric vehicle's batteries without requiring the operator to plug in. The Denso system is designed to enable a conventionally powered truck to continue running auxiliary systems without the need to continue running an idling engine to generate electricity.

Denso envisions its system reducing exhaust emissions each time a commercial vehicle stops to make a pickup or delivery.

The test will look for any operational issues and search for ways to enhance the system's convenience. Denso hopes to commercialize its technology by 2020. By then, it aims to reduce the size, weight and cost of the system.