12/14/2018

U.S. Emissions of CO2 On the Rise Again

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

Emissions of carbon dioxide by U.S. electric power plants and vehicles are expected to climb 3% this year, reversing three consecutive years of decline, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

Share

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

Emissions of carbon dioxide by U.S. electric power plants and vehicles are expected to climb 3% this year, reversing three consecutive years of decline, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

EIA attributes the increase on seasonal temperature swings, which hiked natural gas consumption for heating in winter and to operate electric generation for air conditioning in summer. A chart posted by Bloomberg News (above) shows that CO2 levels have see-sawed downward for seven years from a high of 5.6 billion metric tons in 2010 to less than 5.2 billion metric tons last year.

EIA forecasts that more moderate temperatures will result in a 1% decline in CO2 emissions in 2019.

The Trump administration has pointed to falling CO2 levels as proof that its goal of easing emission rules is paying off. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency notes that the country’s energy-related CO2 output fell 14% between 2005 and 2017, as global energy-related emissions rose more than 20%.

Environmentalists scoff at the argument, Bloomberg reports. They attribute declines in CO2 to tougher pollution measures implemented during the Obama era.


RELATED CONTENT