12/2/2019

U.K. Lawsuit Calls VW an “Obvious” Diesel Cheat

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A lawsuit involving more than 90,000 Volkswagen diesel owners in the U.K. claims VW is guilty of an “obvious cheat” in rigging diesels to evade emission laws.

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A lawsuit involving more than 90,000 Volkswagen diesel owners in the U.K. claims the carmaker is guilty of an “obvious cheat” in rigging diesels to evade emission laws, the Financial Times reports.

The filing with Britain’s High Court aims to establish that 1.2 million diesel-powered VWs sold in the U.K. were fitted with software that constitutes a “defeat device.” That was the conclusion of KBA, Germany’s federal motor transport authority.

VW asserts that the British court is not bound by KBA’s opinion. The company argues that owners suffered no loss because of its cheating. If the plaintiffs prevail, further litigation will determine whether VW is liable and if so, by how much.

VW has paid some $30 billion in fines, compensation, vehicle buybacks and environmental restitution—mainly for selling 555,000 rigged diesels in the U.S.—over the scandal to date. FT notes that settlements per plaintiff have been considerably more modest in other markets than in the American market.

VW also faces a class action-like lawsuit in Germany on behalf of 400,000 VW diesel owners in the country. That case claims owners lost resale value because of the tainted engines.