12/12/2018 | 1 MINUTE READ

Still No EU Accord on CO2 Limits for Cars

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European Union member countries and the European Parliament continue to debate about future limits for carbon dioxide emissions from cars, Reuters reports.

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European Union member countries and the European Parliament continue to debate about future limits for carbon dioxide emissions from cars, Reuters reports.

The EU has set a regional goal of lowering emissions of CO2 and other greenhouse gases 40% by 2030 compared with a 1990 baseline. The transportation sector contributes 10% of the CO2 emitted in Europe and is the only one in the region whose emissions are continuing to climb, Reuters says.

Carmakers in Europe currently must limit CO2 emissions to 130 grams per kilometer, tightening to 95 g/km by 2021. Those levels represent reductions of 18% and 40%, respectively, from a 2007 baseline.

Last year, an environmental panel of the European Commission suggested an additional 15% reduction for CO2 by 2025, growing to 30% by 2030. In early October, the European Parliament approved a far more aggressive plan that would require cuts of 20% between 2021 and 2025, and 40% by 2030.

But a week later environmental ministers proposed a compromise: a 15% reduction by 2025 and 30% by 2030. Fierce debate has continued without result since then.

Trade group ACEA argues that any CO2 target for 2030 greater than 30% is unrealistic. But several EU member nations contend that the bloc won’t be able to meet its overall emission targets with anything short of a 40% reduction for cars.


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