10/25/2016

Cybersecurity Best Practices for Modern Vehicles

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This report from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration in October 2016 describes several steps the auto industry should take to ensure the security of in-vehicle electronics against cyber attack.

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This report from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration in October 2016 describes several steps the auto industry should take to ensure the security of in-vehicle electronics against cyber attack.

NHTSA's recommendations are nonbinding. They describe what the agency describes as a layered approach to enhance the cyber security of everything from infotainment systems and safety features to the complex operating systems required for fully autonomous vehicles.

The agency urges vehicle manufacturers to adopt existing cyber security measures already used by other industries, build-in cyber security rather than attempt to add it to existing software and set up numerous procedures to test, verify and assess the security of their software.

The report also says carmakers should set up faster and more comprehensive procedures to share information about cyber securty, cyber attacks and lessons learned.

 

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